Voter turnout research paper

Since the launch of the voter turnout database, the Electoral Processes Programme at International IDEA has ensured that the data have been regularly updated. The primary sources for the data on voter registration, total vote and corresponding voter turnout are the national electoral management bodies (EMBs) and national statistical bureaus of countries listed in the database. Data from the EMBs are obtained from either their official reports or information provided in their official web portals. In few cases, when data are not available from the EMBs, the information on voter turnout is obtained from secondary sources as listed above. Population and freedom house indicators are always obtained from secondary sources.

Enter the email address you signed up with and we'll email you a reset link.

 · By examining public voter rolls, the researchers were able to compare actual turnout among the groups. They determined that the message showing ...

More importantly, according to experts, the methodology of the report Baldwin cites is lacking. Put simply: The voter ID requirement undoubtedly prevented or discouraged some people from voting. But the report attributes all of the decrease in turnout to the ID law, when there are many other reasons that could also explain it, including a lack of enthusiasm for Clinton or Trump, or perhaps a belief that Trump couldn’t win Wisconsin.

Socio-economic status:  Wealthy Americans vote at much higher rates than those of lower socio-economic status. During the  2008 presidential election , only 41% of eligible voters making less than $15,000 a year voted, compared to 78% of those making $150,000 a year or more.  Studies  have shown that this difference in turnout affects public policy: politicians are more likely to respond to the desires of their wealthy constituents than of their poorer constituents, in part because more of their wealthy constituents vote.

A project of the Harvard Kennedy School's Shorenstein Center and the Carnegie-Knight Initiative , Journalist’s Resource is an open-access site that curates scholarly studies and reports.

Learn more

voter turnout research paper

Voter turnout research paper

More importantly, according to experts, the methodology of the report Baldwin cites is lacking. Put simply: The voter ID requirement undoubtedly prevented or discouraged some people from voting. But the report attributes all of the decrease in turnout to the ID law, when there are many other reasons that could also explain it, including a lack of enthusiasm for Clinton or Trump, or perhaps a belief that Trump couldn’t win Wisconsin.

Action Action

voter turnout research paper

Voter turnout research paper

Action Action

voter turnout research paper

Voter turnout research paper

 · By examining public voter rolls, the researchers were able to compare actual turnout among the groups. They determined that the message showing ...

Action Action

voter turnout research paper
Voter turnout research paper

More importantly, according to experts, the methodology of the report Baldwin cites is lacking. Put simply: The voter ID requirement undoubtedly prevented or discouraged some people from voting. But the report attributes all of the decrease in turnout to the ID law, when there are many other reasons that could also explain it, including a lack of enthusiasm for Clinton or Trump, or perhaps a belief that Trump couldn’t win Wisconsin.

Action Action

Voter turnout research paper

Action Action

voter turnout research paper

Voter turnout research paper

Enter the email address you signed up with and we'll email you a reset link.

Action Action

voter turnout research paper

Voter turnout research paper

 · By examining public voter rolls, the researchers were able to compare actual turnout among the groups. They determined that the message showing ...

Action Action

voter turnout research paper

Voter turnout research paper

Action Action

Bootstrap Thumbnail Second

Voter turnout research paper

Socio-economic status:  Wealthy Americans vote at much higher rates than those of lower socio-economic status. During the  2008 presidential election , only 41% of eligible voters making less than $15,000 a year voted, compared to 78% of those making $150,000 a year or more.  Studies  have shown that this difference in turnout affects public policy: politicians are more likely to respond to the desires of their wealthy constituents than of their poorer constituents, in part because more of their wealthy constituents vote.

Action Action

Bootstrap Thumbnail Third

Voter turnout research paper

Action Action